Restricted and Prohibited Items

While specific restrictions apply to the transport of some items, other items cannot be brought onto the plane at all.

Please refer to the links below to see what you can and can’t bring in your carry-on and checked baggage.

You can also find essential information on the Canadian Air Transport Security AuthorityOpens in New Window (CATSA) website.

Common Items

Lithium metal or lithium ion cells and batteries

Portable electronic devices with lithium metal or lithium ion cells or batteries, such as watches, calculating machines, cameras, cellular phones, laptop computers*, camcorders, etc., are accepted under the following conditions:

  • Lithium metal or alloy cells and batteries:
    • Only lithium metal cells or batteries with a maximum lithium content of 2 grams are allowed.
    • The following are allowed in carry-on baggage only*:
      • Consumer electronic devices containing accepted lithium metal cells or batteries;
      • Spare lithium metal cells or batteries (in reasonable quantities).
    • Batteries must be individually protected to prevent short circuits, e.g. exposed terminals can be taped over, each individual battery can be in a protective pouch or separate plastic bag, or batteries can be in their original retail packaging.
  • Lithium ion cells and batteries up to 100 Watt Hours (Wh) each
    • The following are allowed in carry-on baggage only*:
      • Consumer electronic devices containing accepted lithium ion cells or batteries with a rating of not more than 100 Wh each;
      • Spare lithium ion cells or batteries with a rating of not more than 100 Wh each.
  • Lithium ion batteries with a rating of 100 but not exceeding 160 Watt Hours (Wh)
    • A maximum of two (2) individually protected spare lithium ion batteries with a rating of 100 Wh but not exceeding 160 Wh may be carried per passenger in carry-on baggage only*, pending approval by Air Canada airport agents.

Alkali-manganese (alkaline), Zinc-carbon (dry cell), nickel metal hydride (NiMH), nickel cadmium (NiCd) and silver oxide batteries (Non lithium)

  • Such batteries are allowed in carry-on baggage only*.
  • Batteries must be individually protected to prevent short circuits, e.g. exposed terminals can be taped over, each individual battery can be in a protective pouch or separate plastic bag, or batteries can be in their original retail packaging.

Batteries used to power portable battery-powered medical devices

Batteries used to power mobility aids

  • Spillable and non-spillable batteries for battery-powered mobility aids (e.g. wheelchairs) are accepted in checked baggage, but require special handling. See our wheelchair and mobility aid page for more information.

* On smaller aircraft (e.g. Jazz Dash-8 or CRJ) with limited onboard storage space, you’re asked to deposit your carry-on items on a cart as you board the plane. Battery-powered devices and spare batteries must always be removed from carry-on baggage that is deposited on such carts and carried into the aircraft cabin.

 

Battery-powered mobility aids

Spillable and non-spillable batteries for battery-powered mobility aids (e.g. wheelchairs) are accepted in checked baggage, but require special handling. See our wheelchair and mobility aid page for more information.

Portable battery-powered medical devices

Batteries used to power portable battery-powered medical devices (e.g. a Personal Oxygen Concentrator (POC), Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), Nebulizer) may be carried onboard to power these medical devices, but are subject to prior approval for transport by the Air Canada Medical Assistance Desk.

Small lithium battery-powered vehicles

Small lithium battery-powered vehicles are not accepted in either checked baggage or carry-on baggage due to safety concerns associated to the lithium batteries that power them.

  • Vehicles not accepted include hoverboards, electric skateboards, airwheels, mini-Segways and balance wheels.
  • Please contact Air Canada CargoOpens in New Window for detailed information on the safe shipment of your vehicle.

Drones

Drones are accepted in carry-on baggage on the condition that they remain turned off and safely stowed at all times. They cannot be used onboard the aircraft.

Drones are accepted in checked baggage: the lithium batteries must be removed from the drone and carried onboard in carry-on baggage.  Drones must be properly packaged for shipping.

Vancouver International Airport (YVR)

Use our wayfinding information to navigate the country’s second busiest airport.

Curling irons:

  • One (1) gas-operated curling iron with its hydrocarbon gas container is accepted in checked baggage, provided the safety cover is securely fitted over the heating element.
  • One (1) curling iron without the gas container is accepted in carry-on baggage.
  • Separate gas refills for curling irons are not permitted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Lighters:

Only one of the following items, intended for individual use, is permitted when it is when carried on one’s person (e.g. in pocket or purse):

  • One (1) Bic-type butane lighter, OR
  • One (1) USB lighter, OR
  • One (1) book of matches

No other type of lighter is accepted in carry-on or checked baggage.

For departures from the United-States, Bic-type lighters are the only lighters accepted past US pre-clearance checkpoints. Fuel refills are not permitted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Dry ice:

Dry ice is often used in the packaging of perishable items (e.g. fish, seafood) to keep them cool.
Items packed in dry ice are accepted in carry-on or checked baggage provided they are properly wrapped/packed to protect against leakage, then placed in a box, carton or container that:

  • is properly vented to allow for the release of carbon dioxide gas,
  • is in good condition and free of any damage.

Dry ice must not exceed 2.5 kg (5 lbs) in weight (total weight of 2.5 kg is for carry-on baggage and checked baggage combined per passenger).

Checked baggage restrictions:

  • If you’re travelling with a dry ice container as checked baggage you must:
    • arrive at the airport at least one hour prior to departure to allow for proper handling of dry ice, and
    • sign a declaration form that certifies that the package is in good condition and provides a description of contents.

If your itinerary includes a connecting flight with another airline you may NOT travel with a dry ice container as checked baggage due to special handling requirements.

Brine:

Brine spillage from fish and seafood is corrosive. Lobsters, mussels, oysters etc. must be packaged in leak proof containers and then be packed in plastic bags inside *waxed* cartons.

Gel/ice packs:

Gel and ice packs are subject to all liquid and gel restrictions (see Liquids and gels link above).
If you must keep an item cool you may want to use frozen peas as an alternative to a gel/ice pack.

Exception:  gel/ice packs that are used to refrigerate medication are exempt from these restrictions, provided the medication bears a label or is accompanied by a doctor’s/pharmacist’s note stating that refrigeration is required.

Accepted items include alcoholic beverages, perfume, cologne, aerosols and medicines containing alcohol. Release valves on aerosols must be protected by a cap or other suitable means to prevent inadvertent release of the contents.

The following items are not accepted in checked or carry-on baggage:

  • Canned oxygen (also known as recreational or flavoured oxygen)
  • Alcoholic beverages with an alcohol content of 70% or more

Carry-on baggage

  • They are in containers of 100 ml/ 100 g (3.4 oz.) or less.
    • Containers over 100mL/100g (3.4oz) will be confiscated from carry-on baggage at the security checkpoint.
  • The containers are placed in one (1) clear, closed and re-sealable plastic bag no larger than 1 litre (1 quart).
    • One re-sealable plastic bag per passenger is permitted.

Checked baggage

  • Liquids, gels and aerosols (e.g. hairspray, medicines containing alcohol, perfume, and cologne) are accepted in checked baggage provided:
  • Their total capacity doesn’t exceed 2 L or 2 kg (75 fl. oz.) per passenger.

The acceptance of alcoholic beverages in checked baggage is based on their alcohol content:

  • Alcohol content of no more than 70% (140 proof): accepted in checked baggage
  • Alcohol content of more than 70% (140 proof): not accepted in either checked or carry-on baggage.

MREs - Meals Ready to Eat - and self-heating meals or beverages are not accepted on board our aircraft, in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Only certain models of personal oxygen concentrators (POCs) are accepted sources of medical oxygen for customers requiring supplemental oxygen during flight.

Read additional information for passengers requiring oxygen for travel.

The following are not accepted in either your carry-on or checked baggage:

  • Personal oxygen cylinders and oxygen generators;
  • Canned oxygen (also known as recreational or flavoured oxygen);
  • Personal medical oxygen devices that use liquid oxygen.
    • These devices are also prohibited on one's person.

Other restricted or prohibited items

Air purifiers and ionizers for personal use:

  • Are accepted only in carry-on baggage and must not be used on board the aircraft at any time.

Air purifiers and ionizers for home use:

  • Are accepted in carry-on baggage provided they remain safely stowed at all time.
  • Are accepted in checked baggage provided the batteries are removed and placed in carry-on baggage.

Canned oxygen (also known as recreational or flavoured oxygen) is not accepted in checked or carry-on baggage.

Avalanche rescue backpacks (one per passenger) are accepted as checked baggage only on the condition that they’re equipped with:

  • a pyrotechnic trigger mechanism with no more than 200 mg of explosive substance (Division 1.4S);
    • The explosive must be packaged or designed in a way that presents no significant hazard
  • a cylinder of non-flammable, non-toxic compressed gas (Division 2.2)
    • The cylinder must remain installed in the backpack at all times.

The accepted backpack must be packed in such a way that it can’t be accidentally activated. The airbag within the backpack must be fitted with pressure relief valves.

Exception: JetForce avalanche airbag packs and any spare lithium batteries are accepted as carry-on baggage only, provided the lithium batteries meet acceptance conditions. See "Batteries" in the "Common Items" section above.

Note: Avalanche rescue backpacks are not accepted on flights to, from or via the United States.

Replacement/spare cylinders for rescue backpacks

Replacement/spare cylinders are accepted in checked baggage only, provided they’re empty.

Avalanche transceivers

Avalanche transceivers are accepted in both carry-on and checked baggage provided the batteries are removed from the unit and stored separately. See "Batteries" in the "Common items" section above.

*** Please also see “Oxygen for medical purposes“ in the Common Items section ***

Scuba tanks can be accepted as checked baggage provided that you can show that the cylinder is empty.

Paintball cylinders can be accepted as checked baggage provided you can show that the regulator/valve has been removed from the cylinder.

CO2 cylinders and other pneumatic devices used in the operation of mechanical limbs are accepted in both carry-on and checked baggage.

  • The following items are not accepted for transport aboard our aircraft:
  • Camping stove gas cartridges such as butane\propane mix or propane. (See ‘Camping’ section above)
  • Propane cylinders
  • Carbon dioxide or nitrogen cylinders (pressurized)
  • Fire extinguishers

Portable oxygen cylinders (other than those supplied by us on our aircraft) 

Corrosive materials:

Acids, alkalis, rust preventing or removing compounds, sulphur dioxide solution, chemical kits and mercury are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Oxidizing materials:

Bleach, bleaching powder and peroxides are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Bear spray, mace and pepper spray are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Insect repellents (aerosol and non-aerosol) are accepted:

  • if they are non-toxic and non-flammable;
  • in carry-on baggage if the canister contains no more than 100ml (3.4oz);
  • in checked baggage if the release valve is protected by a cap or other suitable means to prevent inadvertent release of the contents. 

Flammable liquids are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage. These include but are not limited to: gasoline, petroleum spirits, oil-based paint, lacquer, stains, shellac, oils, wood alcohol, lighter or heating fuels.
Flammable solids are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage. These include but are not limited to: matches, charcoal briquettes, and any other ignitable article.

Exceptions:

  • Only one of the following items, intended for individual use, is permitted when it is carried on one’s person (e.g. in pocket or purse):
    • One (1) Bic-type butane lighter, OR
    • One (1) USB lighter, OR
    • One (1) book of matches

See ‘Curling irons and lighters’ section above.

  • Papier maché statues/piñatas are accepted in carry-on baggage provided they are transported in a sealed plastic bag. However, the items will be refused if it is determined that they smell of fuel.

Passengers travelling with a firearm, ammunition or cartridges must declare the items during the check-in process and complete a declaration form.

Firearms

The firearm and the ammunition must not be packed in the same container. One declaration form must be completed for each container.

  • Accepted firearms: Only hunting rifles, shotguns, BB guns, paintball guns, biathlon rifles, air pistols and certain handguns are accepted as checked baggage.
  • Restricted firearms: Visit the Canadian Firearms ProgramOpens in New Window and Canada Border Services AgencyOpens in New Window (CBSA) websites for essential information on government documentation required for transporting restricted firearms (e.g. handguns).
  • All firearms:
    • must be unloaded: when checking in a firearm, customers must sign a declaration form attesting that the firearm is not loaded.
    • must be rendered inoperable by means of a secure locking device mechanism (i.e. a trigger lock), but only after the check-in process has been completed;
    • must be packed and locked in a specially designed, non-transparent case that can’t be easily broken into during transport.
  • Travel outside Canada: It’s your sole responsibility to ensure that you are in compliance with the firearm and ammunition regulations of each country on your itinerary.
    • Non-compliance can result in the seizure of your firearm.
  • Only passengers age 18 and over may carry a firearm in checked baggage.
  • Passengers wishing to travel with a firearm in their checked baggage are advised to be at the airport a full 30 minutes before the normal recommended check-in time for their flight.

See detailed packing instructions as well as important information on other restrictions and charges as they apply to firearms on the hunting equipment page.

Ammunition:

The firearm and the ammunition must not be packed in the same container.

The firearm and the ammunition must not be packed in the same container.

  • Only shells and cartridges are accepted and must be carried in checked baggage. Gunpowder and gunpowder pellets are strictly prohibited.
  • Ammunition must be packed in a separate, secure and strong container made of plastic, wood or metal. The original fibreboard carton can also be used but it is recommended that the carton be placed in a secondary package such as a re-sealable plastic container. To avoid shock movement, the properly packed ammunition must then be placed inside a suitcase and cushioned with clothing.

Ammunition allowance is limited to 5 kg (11 lb) per passenger. Allowances for more than one passenger cannot be combined into one or more packages.

Accepted:

Devices whose fuel tank is permanently attached to the device (e.g. lawn mowers, grass trimmers) are accepted as checked baggage:

  • Only if they are new and in the original unopened packaging.
  • Only on Air Canada and Air Canada Express flights.

See the ‘Camping equipment' section above for specific rules regarding camping stoves.

Prohibited:

Regardless of whether they’re in their original packaging or not, items powered by a fuel-powered engine won’t be accepted as checked baggage:

  • If your itinerary includes a codeshare flight with another carrier;
  • If you're travelling to, from or via the U.S.
  • If you're travelling from or via a European Union country.
    • Switzerland adheres to European Union prohibited items regulations. Items powered by a fuel-operated engine are not accepted for travel from or via that country.

Any fuel-powered device that has been previously used won’t be accepted as checked baggage:

  • Fuel containers/tanks that have contained fuel (e.g. jerrican) and fuel-powered devices that have already been used contain residual amounts of fuel even after the fuel tank has been emptied.

Fuel-powered devices that are not accepted as checked baggage may be shipped via Air Canada CargoOpens in New Window.

Accepted:

Tubes of oil-based and latex paint used by artists are accepted provided the material is packaged in absorbent material and placedin a heavy, plastic leak-proof bag/container.

Prohibited:

Oil-based paint, latex paint, lacquer, stains, shellac, and oils are not accepted in carry-on or checked baggage. Please contact your local Air Canada CargoOpens in New Window office for shipment of these items.

Arsenic, cyanide, insecticides, pesticides/weed killer and other types of poisonous or toxic substances are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Radioactive materials - including medicinal or commercial isotopes - and devices that use radioactive materials are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage. All such materials must be shipped via Air Canada CargoOpens in New Window.

Security attaché cases and cash boxes or bags that incorporate lithium batteries and/or pyrotechnic materials are not accepted in either carry-on or checked baggage.

Travel to Other Countries

Canada's policy on restricted and prohibited items may vary from that of other countries. Travellers are urged to check with their local airport operator before travelling.

Travel to, from or via the U.S. or the U.K.:

For restrictions that apply to travellers departing from the United States or the United Kingdom, visit:

Travel to European Union countries:

Passengers travelling to European Union (EU) countries are asked to take note of strict regulations that apply to the importation of restricted products such as meat and milk products for personal consumption.

Certain meat and milk products, e.g. powdered infant formula, infant food and special foods required for medical reasons are allowed to enter the EU provided:

  • the product does not require refrigeration before consumption;
  • it is a packaged registered trademark or proprietary brand product;
  • the packaging is intact.

Passengers wishing to bring other types of meat or milk products into the EU must:

  • obtain, prior to travel, all necessary documentation from official veterinary services of the country from which they are travelling (the documents must state that the goods conform to all requirements for entry into the EU);
  • declare all such goods and present related documentation upon arrival at an authorized EU border inspection post for veterinary control.

All meat and milk products that do not conform to applicable regulations will be confiscated and disposed of at the EU border inspection post. Failure to declare meat and milk products may result in a fine or criminal prosecution.